Balanced Products – using unintended driver/receiver combinations:
 

Q. Can I use a BVD-10 and a BVR-25 to send and receive stereo (two channel) analog audio?

A. This is not recommended and probably will result in distorted audio. The audio output channels of the BVD-10 operate at much higher voltage levels than the video input channels of the BVR-25 are designed to accept. You would most likely overdrive the BVR-25.

 

Q. Can I use a BVD-10 or BVD-20 and a BVR-10 or BVR-20 to send and receive a cable TV signal 100 feet and then go into the cable box?

A. Unfortunately not - the cable TV signal is a modulated signal of wide bandwidth carrying both VHF and UHF.

 

Q. Can I use a BVD-20 to send four digital audio signals?

A. Yes, in general any "video" channel may be used to send digital audio. In addition, you would need to use a BVR-20,25 or 30 to receive the signal.

 

Q. Can I use a BVD-10 and BVR-10 to send component video?

A. Not really. The BVD-10 sends two channels of audio and two channels of video. You can not send video over the "audio" channels.

 

Q. Can I use a BVD-20 and a BVR-20 to send three composite video and one mono analog audio signals?

A. Yes, but be very careful not to overdrive the "digital audio" channel since it has a lower voltage limitation than analog audio channels. If there is audio distortion, turn down the analog audio input into the BVD-20.

 

Q. Can I use a BVD-20 and a BVR-10 to send component video and mono analog audio?

A. No you can not since the BVR-10 accepts two channels of audio and two channels of video. You can not send video over the "audio" channels.

 

Q. Can I use a BLD-10 and a BVR-10 to send two pairs (four channels) of stereo audio?

A. Yes but there is a lot of work to do this and some signal level restrictions. Much better is to use a BLR-10. If you must, remember the two "video" channels have a lower voltage limitation than the two analog channels and that you will have to figure out which channel on the BLD-10 is driving which channel on the BVR-10 by trial and error.